distributedcomputing.info logo
 
Home   Forum   Wiki   Blog   News and Articles   Active Projects   Computing Platforms  
Upcoming Projects   Recently Completed Projects   Past Projects  
Tools   Development Platforms   Conferences   Parody and Fun Sites   Links   Politics
Teams   Books and Journals   FAQ   Link to Us



Active Distributed Computing Projects - Science

These links take you to other project categories on this site:

Science   Life Sciences   Cryptography   Internet   Financial
Mathematics   Language   Art   Puzzles/Games   Miscellaneous   Distributed Human Projects
Collaborative Knowledge Bases   Charity

See the bottom of this page for a description of the icons on the page.

Project Information Project % Complete Major Supported Platforms
 
Search for extra-terrestrial radio signals at SETI@home.

On July 25, 2008, the project owners began releasing work units for SETI@home's Astropulse project.

The project passed 2 billion credits on July 14, 2005. The project received its 1 billionth BOINC result on September 24, 2008.

In 2010 the project hopes to implement some major new features, including a "Near-Time Persistency Checker (NTPCkr) which makes SETI@home more efficient in identifying candidate signals," a web-based distributed human project to view and help rank candidate signals, improved methods for identifying and rejecting Earth-generated radio frequency interference (RFI), and expanding its frequency search beyond the current 2.5 MHz band.

See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. See the project applications page for the latest version of the project clients.

See a guide for customizing the SETI@Home BOINC client graphics, and unsupported add-on tools available for the client. See information about porting and optimizing the BOINC SETI@home client. See a Powerpoint slide presentation about Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC), the open-source software architecture used for the new SETI@home. These slides were used for a presentation at the 2002 O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference. See a paper, New SETI Sky Surveys for Radio Pulses (PDF), co-written by the CASPER, SETI@home and Astropulse teams on November 14, 2008. The paper will be published in Acta Astronautica.

See the status of the project servers. Also see the project's latest technical news and its future plans.

See The Planetary Society's latest newsletter about SETI@home, published January 15, 2008.

Listen to a September 15, 2008 audio interview with Dan Werthimer about the Astropulse project.

See the SETI@home bookstore and learn more about SETI and the science behind it.

See a Spanish-language website in Chile about SETI, SETI@bome and BOINC.

View the SETI@home BOINC discussion forum.

SETI@home:
credits
Windows 32
Linux
MacOS
Solaris
Climate Prediction logo Help climateprediction.net predict Earth's climate 50 years from now. The project uses a large-scale Monte Carlo simulation to predict what the climate will do in the future. On June 22, 2004, the project began a new phase of its experiment, to study "Thermohaline Circulation (THC) slowdown," or how climate might change as CO2 changes in the event of a decrease in the strength of the thermohaline circulation. This kind of climate change is shown in the movie The Day After Tomorrow. Participants can choose between running the old or the new experiment. See the first results of this experiment (posted July 28, 2004). On August 26, 2005 the project began a new sulphur cycle experiment "to identify the effects of sulphate aerosol on the global climate system [the 'global dimming' effect] and the sensitivity of the model to perturbing sulphur cycle parameters." This experiment adds 2 additional phases to the three phases of the tradtional experiment. On September 4, 2008 the project began a HADSM3 Mid-Holocene (hadsm3mh) experiment. On October 1 2008, the project began a HADCM3L geoengineering experiment.

From February 14, 2006 to February 10, 2007, the project ran the BBC Climate Change Experiment in collaboration with the BBC and BOINC. That project used the Transient Coupled Model with a dynamic ocean, rather than the "slab model," or unchanging ocean, used in previous climateprediction.net experiments. Work units for that experiment took about 2.3 times longer to complete than climateprediction.net's sulphur cycle work units, and about 6.6 times longer than climateprediction.net's slab model work units. Results from the BBC Climate Change Experiment were published on February 10, 2007.

On August 8, 2005, the project was approved for funding to build a regional climate model into the project. This model is generating higher-resolution forecasts for limited areas of the world. Scientists from countries which cannot perform their own client modeling could propose regions for which to generate forecasts, and project participants could choose a region they wanted to help. This feature was planned to be integrated into the project by the end of 2006.

The first climate models for a full 45-year beta-test simulation were successfully completed on March 6, 2003. The project received its 5,000th result on November 7, 2003. See some normal and abnormal results. In the 3 months after the project launch, it achieved: 9,796 completed full runs, 882,272 modelled years, 43,548 registered users, and the web site was translated into 14 languages. By April 6, 2004, the project completed 1.5 million years of simulation in over 22,000 runs. By July 5, 2004, the project completed 2 million years of simulation in over 30,000 runs. By October 18, 2004, the project completed 3 million years of simulation in over 40,000 runs. By December 14, 2004, the project completed 50,000 runs. By January 25, 2005, the project completed 60,000 runs. By July 14, 2005, the project completed 100,000 standard runs. By August 16, 2005, the project completed 8 million years of simulation in over 110,000 runs. The project began supporting a BOINC-based client on August 26 2004. The project turned 1 on September 14, 2004: by that date "78,000 people in over 130 countries had completed 35,000 45-year GCM runs, computed 2.5 million model years and donated 6,000 years of computing time." On September 17, 2004, a book about using new technologies to sustain and protect natural ecosystems was released: chapter 12 of the book is about climateprediction.net and was written by several climateprediction.net team members. By December 22, 2005, the project completed 10 million model years. By July 1, 2008, the project completed 33 million model years.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. See the project's applications page for a list of its latest clients and versions.

An advanced visualization package is available for some Windows platforms as of July 15, 2004. Also, Windows users with Photoshop can download a Photoshop plug-in to make a 3D model of their simulation results. Version 2.0 of the package is available for the classic and BOINC clients, for Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, as of April 8, 2005.

A research paper about the project "has been accepted for the 1st IEEE International Conference on e-Science and Grid Computing in Melbourne Australia this December. It outlines the challenges of running a large-scale long-term application via volunteer computing, compares CPDN with other volunteer computing projects, and shows how using BOINC has really helped the project both obtain and retain users."

Students and teachers can access school resources for the project.

Subscribe to the project's RSS feed.

Join a discussion forum for this project.

ongoing:
model years completed;
HadSM3: 302,962 runs, HadAM3: 29,249 runs, HadCM3: 23,726 runs, Sulphur Cycle: 14,988 runs, Spinup: 61 runs, HadSM3MH: 18,208 runs;
0 credits (0 BOINC runs) completed
dialup-friendly

Windows 32
Linux
MacOS

Muon1 logo Help design a more efficient particle accelerator in Stephen Brooks' Muon1 Distributed Particle Accelerator Design project. The project "simulates the pion-to-muon decay channel (grey cylinders surrounding a straight blue path) of the RAL Neutrino Factory front end design. This is different to the previous versions of the solenoid-channel-only optimisation because it varies all parameters of the solenoids independently of one another. The bending chicane featured in versions 4.0-4.2x will be replaced by a linear accelerator and a muon 'cooling ring' in version 5."

On July 16, 2010, the project reached the 20 quadrillion (20,000,000,000,000,000) particle time-steps (pts) milestone. This is the amount of work needed to simulate a particle for 55 hours, 33 minutes and 20 seconds, which at an average of 90% of the speed of light (0.9c) would cover a distance of 360 Astronomical Units--ten times the average distance between Pluto and the Sun, and three times further than the most distance man-made object (Voyager 1) has traveled. On June 10, 2011, the project reached the 25 quadrillion particle timestep milestone. This is equivalent to simulating a single particle for 69 hours, 26 minutes, 40 seconds, which would cover a distance of about 501 AUs (Voyager 1, the most distant man-made object is 117 AU from the Sun). On December 29, 2011, the project reached the 30 quadrillion particle timestep miletone.

See technical reports and papers from this project. See an excellent summary of the project's progress in 2011.

The client does not need to contact a project server to get work. It submits results via ftp whenever it accumulates more than 100 Kbytes of results. The software also includes a separate ftp client which you can use to submit results manually. The Windows version of the client can be run as a screen-saver or from the command-line. Version 4.45 of the client is available for Windows as of March 31, 2011. This is the first new version in three years: read about its improvements. Version 4.33 and later can be run under Linux using Wine. See details about all of the client versions. BOINC users can participate in this project via the yoyo@home Muon project.

Join a discussion forum about the project.

ongoing:
89,397785 simulations completed
dialup-friendly

Windows 32

LHC particle animation Help LHC@home design the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a particle accelerator being built by CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. LHC@home "simulates 60 particles at a time as they travel around the ring, and runs the simulation for 100,000 [to 1,000,000] loops around the ring ... to test whether the beam is going to remain on a stable orbit for a much longer time, or risks losing control and flying off course into the walls of the vacuum tube - a very serious problem that could result in the machine being stopped for repairs if it happens in real life. By repeating such calculations thousands of times it is possible to map out the conditions under which the beam should be stable." On June 30, 2005, the project released its first set of work units which simulate 1 million loops around the ring. On January 28, 2006, it began its next study. "The new study is an extension of previous simulations. We want to evaluate the long term beam stability in the LHC in the presence of unknown or partially corrected magnetic imperfections, i.e. small field errors in the magnet elements. This scenario must be expected especially in the first few years of the LHC and in particular during its startup in 2007. An essential part of this study is therefore the definition and test of a dedicated configuration for the LHC commissioning. The necessary resources for such a study are available only within the LHC@home project."

The project released its first status report on November 3, 2004. It successfully completed over 500,000 jobs by that date with the help of 6,000 registered users and 7,500 active computers. It released its fourth status report on September 8, 2005. The project is in production mode as of July 13, 2005. The project officially relaunched in the UK (where it is now based) on October 12, 2007. The project will run the SixTrack application until the LHC starts in 2008, and will continue running after the LHC launch to compare simulation data with real data. The project will also begin running the Garfield application (which simulates two- and three-dimensional drift chambers (i.e. gaseous detectors) sometime in the near future, and may eventually run another application "simulating particle collisions for the ATLAS experiment, one of the four major LHC experiments."

The project uses a BOINC-based client, which runs an application called SixTrack. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. SixTrack's graphical screensaver displays a cross-section of the beam of particles that SixTrack is simulating. Version 4.67 of the application is available for Windows as of April 12, 2005. Version 4.66 is available for Linux as of April 8, 2005. Linux users with NFS-mounted work directories should read the Known Bugs for the client. Version 7.11 of the Garfield application is available for Windows and Linux as of September 7, 2007.

Join a discussion forum about the project.

ongoing;
credits
dialup-friendly

Windows 32
Linux

Einstein@Home logo Help Einstein@Home search for evidence of gravitational waves predicted in 1916 by Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity but never detected. The project searches for "spinning neutron stars (also called pulsars) [which are likely to emit gravitational waves] using data from the LIGO and GEO gravitational wave detectors. Einstein@home is a World Year of Physics 2005 project supported by the American Physical Society (APS) and by a number of international organizations." The first production run of Einstein@Home "carried out a search for pulsars over the entire sky using the most sensitive 600 hours of data from LIGO's third science run, S3 which made observations between October, 2003 and January, 2004. Analysis of the S3 data was completed on May 3, 2005. A status report with the results of the S3 data analysis was published on September 11, 2005. See the discussion forum thread about the status report. Bruce Allen gave a talk about the final S3 results (see report (PDF)) on January 2, 2006, at the 10th annual Gravitational Wave Data Analysis Workshop. Analysis of S4 data began on June 28, 2005 and was completed in July, 2006. Results of S4 were released on April 11, 2008. Analysis of S5 data began on June 15, 2006. Processing for the S5R3 work units was completed on September 25, 2008. "S5R3 was the first search using the combined F-stat plus Hough method, which is currently the most sensitive search technique that is known. This search used approximately one year of data from LIGO's first science run (S5) at design sensitivity. The S5R3 post-processing is being led by Dr. Maria Alessandra Papa, one of the inventors of the search technique." Analysis of S5R5 data began on January 13, 2009.

On January 20, 2011, the project began a new round of searching for radio pulsars in short-orbital-period binary systems. Data for this search is from the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey (from the Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia). Also on January 20, 2011, the project released a new application called BRP3 (which is optimized to run up to 20 times faster on NVIDIA graphics processor cards than on a PC CPU).

The project reported its first discovery in August, 2010. It found a disrupted binary pulsar 17,000 light-years away from Earth, rotating more than 40 times a second, that has broken free of its binary companion. The project reported its second discovery, a radio pulsar orbiting a white dwarf star, on March 1, 2011. The pulsar orbits "the white dwarf star once every 9.4 hours. The pulsar, called J1952+2630, is spinning on its axis 48 times per second. It was discovered in data collected at Arecibo Observatory in 2005 by the PALFA Collaboration. The white-dwarf companion star is unusually massive, and weighs at least 95% as much as our sun. This means that J1952+2630 probably belongs to a rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars (five were previously known)." See the pulsar's "discovery plots" near the top of the Einstein@Home (re)detection page. The project discovered new pulsars in Arecibo radio telescope data (specifically the "Mock" back-end spectrometer) on October 27, 2011, November 8, 2011, and December 8, 2011. See all of the project's pulsar discoveries.

On November 26, 2013 the project reported its first discovery of gamma-ray pulsars: the four pulsars it discovered are the first to be discovered by a public distributed computing project.

The project published its first formal scientific publication on April 11 2008--the results from its search of LIGO S4 data.

The project discovered its 10th pulsar on September 7, 2011. See all of the pulsars discovered by the project.

As of January 27, 2006, the project had more than 100,000 participants with computation credit.

On March 10, 2011, LIGO/GEO scientists at the University of Birmingham released a downloadable, free, fun, interactive computer game called "Space-Time Quest" which allows you to design, build and operate your own interferometric gravitational wave detector with a budget of £100 Million. Watch a one-minute YouTube trailer about the game.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. The project initially ran one application, an all-sky pulsar search. On December 23, 2005 it began releasing Albert, an improved and more sensitive version of the pulsar search application. Note: Each work unit is 12 MB, and the deadline for returning the results of a work unit is 7 days. A work unit takes about 9 hours to finish on a Pentium 4 2.5 GHz CPU. Because of these factors, the project is recommended for users with faster systems and a broadband Internet connection. The graphical screensaver displays "a rotating celestial sphere showing the known constellations, along with the current zenith positions of three gravity wave detectors. Also shown are the positions of the known pulsars and supernovae remnants, and a marker indicating the positions being searched as the calculations proceed." See a detailed description of the screensaver. Version 6.02 of the "Hierarchical all-sky pulsar search" application is available for Windows as of August 4, 2008. Version 6.04 of the pulsar search application is available for Linux as of August 4, 2008. Version 6.03 of the pulsar search application is available for Mac OSX as of August 4, 2008. A beta testing page contains test clients for the project. Version 4.46 of the Windows test client is available as of May 9, 2008. Version 4.43 of the Mac OSX test client is available as of April 24, 2008. Version 4.49 of the Linux test client is available as of May 14, 2008.

See the status of the project servers.

Join a discussion forum about the project.

ongoing:
credits
dialup-friendly

Windows 32
Linux
MacOS

Join the Leiden Classical project, and help create a desktop computing grid for any scientist or science student to use to study general classical dynamics. This is the first project which allows its users to submit calculations for the project to compute.

To submit a calculation to the project, download a standalone version of the Classical client and follow the instructions for using it, then submit your calculation to the project's computing grid.

As of March 13, 2007, the project has a Classical-Builder Java 3D graphical user interface tool for building input files for the Classical application.

The project uses a BOINC-based client, which runs five applications: Classical, upperCASE, trajtou-cu111 trajtou-pt111, and trajtou-pd110paw. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 5.50 of Classical is available for Windows, Linux, Mac OSX and FreeBSD as of December 10, 2007. Version 5.36 of the trajtou clients is available for Windows and Linux as of June 12, 2007.

Join a discussion forum about the project.

ongoing;
credits
dialup-friendly

Windows 32
Linux
MacOS

QMC@home logo Help QMC@home (Quantum Medicinal Chemistry at Home) improve the Quantum Monte Carlo method for general use in Quantum Chemistry. Quantum Chemistry "invents smart approximations to Quantum Theory to predict molecular information with high accuracy." "Reactions between molecules are important for virtually all parts of our lives. The structure and reactivity of molecules can be predicted by Quantum Chemistry." The project published its first results ("'Toward the Exact Solution of the Electronic Schrödinger Equation for Noncovalent Molecular Interactions: Worldwide Distributed Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations' - Our DNA base pair and JSCH2005-S22 benchmark set results, published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A (JPCA) issued by the American Chemical Society (ACS)") in January, 2008.

The project began a new project, 'Mindless' DFT Benchmarking in December, 2009. This project generates thermochemical benchmark sets from test sets of randomly generated "artificial molecules" that "rely on systematic constraints rather than uncontrolled chemical biases." It began another new project, , QASINO on March 4, 2010. QASINO was the QMC@Home version of CASINO, which performs "quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) electronic structure calculations for finite and periodic systems."

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. The project reached its beta test phase, and released a new screensaver, on May 23 2006.

Join a discussion forum about the project.

ongoing;
credits
dialup-friendly

Windows 32
Linux

uFluids Note: This project website is not functional as of March 25, 2015 and you may not be able to participate in the project at this time. Help μFluids@Home simulate "two-phase fluid behavior in microgravity and microfluidics problems" in order to "design better satellite propellant management devices and address two-phase flow in microchannel and MEMS devices."

The project uses the BOINC computing platform to run various applications. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 4.10 of the project's evolver software application is available for Windows as of August 14, 2006. The client is currently only available for Windows, but the project owners will develop a Linux client in the near future, followed by a Mac OSX client.

Note: the project web page is not displaying completely as of November, 2012, indicating the project may be on hold or ended.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
dialup-friendly

Windows 32

Spinhenge@home Note: This project is on hiatus as of September 28, 2011, and the project website is unavailable.

Help Spinhenge@home study the physical characteristics of magnetic molecules to contribute to nano-technology research. Magnetic molecular materials discovered by this project could be used in integrated memory modules or tiny magnetic switches in the future, and could also be used for biotechnology and medical applications (e.g. localized tumor chemotherapy). The project is sponsored by the University of Applied Sciences Bielefeld, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. See more information about the project.

The project uses the BOINC computing platform to run various applications. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 2.42 of the project's Monte Carlo Metropolis software application is available for Windows as of August 29 2006. The client is currently only available for Windows, but a Linux client will be available eventually.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

on hiatus as of September 28, 2011;
credits
dialup-friendly

Windows 32

Cosmology@Home Help Cosmology@Home "search for the model that best describes our Universe and to find the range of models that rgee with the available astronomical and particle physics data." The project does this by finding temperature and polarization anisotropies in cosmic microwave background radiation. Studying these anisotropies helps scientists to learn what the universe was like when it was only 300,000 years old.

The project uses the BOINC computing platform to run various applications. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. See the project's applications page for the latest version of its client applications.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
dialup-friendly

Windows 32
Linux

PS3GRID PS3GRID "is a volunteer computing project based on the PlayStation3 and BOINC for full-atom molecular dynamics simulations and other scientific applications specially optimized for the Cell processor. Your contribution is very important because our Cell MD molecular dynamics software runs over an order of magnitude faster on the PlayStation3 opening the way to innovative computational experiments." Participants who wish to participate in the beta test of the project, and who are capable of and willing to install Linux on their PS3, should send email to ps3grid@gmail.com to get an invitation code.

The project uses the BOINC PS3 computing platform to run various applications.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
dialup-friendly

PS3

GPUGRID GPUGRID is a volunteer computing project based on the NVIDIA GPU (i.e. graphics card) with CUDA technology and BOINC for full-atom molecular dynamics simulations and other scientific applications specially optimized for the NVIDIA GPU.

The project uses the BOINC GPU computing platform to run various applications.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
dialup-friendly

NVIDIA CUDA GPUs

AfricanClimate@Home World Community Grid Help AfricanClimate@Home a World Community Grid project, develop "more accurate climate models of specific regions in Africa. This will serve as a basis for understanding how the climate will change in the future so that measures designed to alleviate the adverse effects of climate change can be implemented." See more information about the project and the project's FAQ.

The first phase of the project ended in July, 2008. As of February 7, 2011, "the scientists for this project are anaylzing the results to prepare for Phase 2 of the project."

The project uses the BOINC computing platform to run various applications. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. If you already have BOINC installed, you can join this and other World Community Grid BOINC-based project by attaching to the project URL www.worldcommunitygrid.org. You can select/de-select World Community Grid projects in your World Community Grid member page, under My Grid --> My Projects.

This project is discussed in the World Community Grid forums.

waiting for phase 2 to begin;
results returned
dialup-friendly

Windows 32
Linux

MilkyWay@home Help MilkyWay@home model and determine the evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy. The project is "creating a highly accurate three dimensional model of the Milky Way galaxy using data gathered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This project enables research in both astroinformatics and computer science." "In computer science, the project is investigating different optimization methods which are resilient to the fault-prone, heterogeneous and asynchronous nature of Internet computing; such as evolutionary and genetic algorithms, as well as asynchronous newton methods. While in astroinformatics, Milkyway@Home is generating highly accurate three dimensional models of the Sagittarius stream, which provides knowledge about how the Milky Way galaxy was formed and how tidal tails are created when galaxies merge."

The project published its first results, "Asynchronous Genetic Search for Scientific Modeling on Large-Scale Heterogeneous Environments," on January 27 2008. It published another paper, "Evolving N-Body Simulations to Determine the Origin and Structure of the Milky Way Galaxy's Halo using Volunteer Computing," to the 25th IEEE International Parallel & Distributed Processing Symposium (IPDPS) on October 19, 2010.

The project uses the BOINC computing platform to run various applications. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 1.13 of the project's MilkyWay@home software application is available for Windows, Linux, Mac OSX, Solaris and FreeBSD as of December 13, 2007.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
dialup-friendly

Windows 32
Linux
MacOS
Solaris

Quake Catcher Network Help Quake Catcher Network detect earthquakes. Quake Catcher Network is "a collaborative initiative for developing the world's largest, low-cost strong-motion seismic network by utilizing sensors in and attached to internet-connected computers. With your help, the Quake-Catcher Network can provide better understanding of earthquakes, give early warning to schools, emergency response systems, and others. The Quake-Catcher Network also provides educational software designed to help teach about earthquakes and earthquake hazards."

See the project's latest news.

The project uses the BOINC computing platform to run various applications. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing dialup-friendly

Windows 32
Linux
MacOS

yoyo@home EvoHo yoyo@home EvoHo is a BOINC-based wrapper for evolution@home.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 1.04 of the project's evolution@home client is available for Windows as of January 6, 2008.

Join a discussion forum about yoyo@home.

567,135,297 credits for all yoyo@home projects as of May 6, 2010 dialup-friendly

Windows 32

yoyo@home Muon yoyo@home Muon is a BOINC-based wrapper for Muon1.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 1.06 of the project's Muon client is available for Windows as of March 8, 2008.

Join a discussion forum about yoyo@home.

567,135,297 credits for all yoyo@home projects as of May 6, 2010 dialup-friendly

Windows 32

Intelligent Design Darwin@Home Help evolve digital creatures which move more efficiently in Intelligent Design a Darwin@Home project. The project's results are stored in publically-accessible XML files. See screenshots and more information about the project.

To participate in the project, click on the Intelligent Design logo on the project's main web page. This will launch a Java Webstart application on your computer which will automatically download and run the Intelligent Design application. Instructions for using the application are displayed within the application itself. The application should run on any computing platform which supports Java. You may need to install the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) in order to run the application. Version 20070511 of the application is available as of May 11, 2007.

ongoing Windows 32
Linux
MacOS
Solaris
BRaTS@Home Help BRaTS@Home (BRaTS Ray Trace Simulator) "do various calculations in Gravitational Ray Tracing. As of August 8, 2007, participation in the project is by invitation only.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 4.00 of the project's ray_trace_ellipse client is available for Windows and Linux as of February 18, 2008. Version 4.00 of the project's test_app client is available for Windows as of February 12, 2008. Version 4.01 of test_app is available for Linux as of February 15, 2008.

Join a discussion forum about the project.

ongoing;
credits
Windows 32
Linux
orbit@home Help orbit@home "monitor the impact hazard posed by Near Earth Objects." The project uses the Orbit Reconstruction, Simulation and Analysis (ORSA) framework. More information can be found at the ORSA@work website and in a presentation poster titled Distributed Computing and Near Earth Objects Hazard Monitoring, published by Pasquale Tricarico of Washington State University on November 14, 2004.

The project completed its testing phase on May 28, 2008, and began its public beta test on May 31, 2008.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 1.31 of the project's SurveySimulator client is available for Windows, Linux and Mac OSX as of May 28, 2008.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
Windows 32
Linux
MacOS
Help Virtual Prairie "do research in understanding clonal strategies in complex ecological systems." See more information about the project. The project is run by the Department of Computer Science at the University of Houston.

The project published a paper, Large scale parameter study of an individual-based model of clonal plant with volunteer computing, on June 3, 2011.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 0.08 of the project's "Application simulating the growth of a clonal plant" client is available for Windows and Linux as of May 14, 2008.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
Windows 32
Linux
Ibercivis Help Ibercivis provide computing resources to scientists in Spain. The original description of the project, which started as ZIVIS last year: "In collaboration with the Institute of Biocomputacion and Fisica de Sistemas Complejos (BIFI) of the University of Zaragoza and the National Laboratory of Fusion of the CIEMAT, the project ZIVIS has started up, whose objective is the creation of a citizen platform of Super Computation based on the union of computer science equipment of the homes and Institutions you publish, to give service to the investigators of our city." The original project researched fusion. This project supports multiple projects and will support scientists all over Spain. The project launches formally sometime in June, but participants can join now with the BOINC project URL http://registro.ibercivis.es/ to help test the project server.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client.

ongoing;
credits
Windows 32
Help Magnetism@home "explore equlibrium, metastable and transient magnetization patterns (first and foremost in nano-scale magnetic elements and their arrays, but later other systems may be considered)."

As of June 9, 2008, the project is calculating "the magnetostatic energy of low-energy magnetic configurations in circular cylidrical nano-element. The resolution is not very high yet, but will be increased as more people join."

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Version 0.02 of the project's circleFMM client is available for Windows and Linux as of June 10, 2008. Version 0.05 of the project's circleFMMNC client is available for Windows and Linux as of June 16, 2008.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
Windows 32
Linux
Genetic Life Help Genetic Life research genetic algorithms. The project is currently simulating the evolution of simple software-based creatures executing a compact set of instructions.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. Gamma version 1.60 of the project's Genetic Life client is available for Windows, Linux and Mac OSX as of October 14, 2008.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
Windows 32
Linux
MacOS
The Clean Energy Project World Community Grid Help The Clean Energy Project develop more efficient organic solar cells. The project, a collaboration between World Community Grid and Harvard University's Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, uses computational chemistry to look for the best molecules possible for: organic photovoltaics to provide inexpensive solar cells, polymers for the membranes used in fuel cells for electricity generation, and how best to assemble the molecules to make those devices." Phase 1 project, which began on December 5, 2008, and ended on October 27, 2009, developed "efficient and inexpensive solar cells using organic molecules, which will satisfy the world's future energy needs through renewable energy resources." Results from the project are published in molecular space and are freely and publicly available: they catalog "the electronic properties of over 2 million organic, carbon-based compounds and their potential for converting sunlight into electricity." About 36,000 of the compounds could potentially show double the light-converting efficiency of current organic solar cells. Neither the World Community Grid nor Harvard will profit from the work contributed by the project's participants. See the World Community Grid's page about the project. See more information about the project. See the project's FAQ. See the project's latest update.

Phase 2 of the project began June 28, 2010. It "is performing electronic structure calculations: To obtain more accurate optical, electronic and other physical properties of the candidate solar materials, quantum mechanics calculations are being performed for each of the candidates. These calculations will be performed with the Q-Chem quantum chemistry software, developed by Q-Chem, Inc. This work will result in a useful database of information about the properties of a large number of compounds. This phase will also provide direct input to experimental groups to aid in their design of improved solar cells."

The project uses the BOINC computing platform to run various applications. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. If you already have BOINC installed, you can join this and other World Community Grid BOINC-based project by attaching to the project URL www.worldcommunitygrid.org. You can select/de-select World Community Grid projects in your World Community Grid member page, under My Grid --> My Projects.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
results returned
Windows 32
Linux
MacOS
AQUA@home Help AQUA@home predict the performance of quantum computing algorithms on several types of problems in fields from materials science to machine learning. "D-Wave's AQUA (Adiabatic QUantum Algorithms) is a research project whose goal is to predict the performance of superconducting adiabatic quantum computers on a variety of hard problems arising in fields ranging from materials science to machine learning. AQUA@home uses Internet-connected computers to help design and analyze quantum computing algorithms, using Quantum Monte Carlo techniques."

The project completed computations for its 96-variable benchmark problems (a.k.a. 96-qubit problems) and published the results on its website on January 13, 2009. "So far the running time of the adiabatic algorithm is linear with the problems size."

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. The project's "D-Wave's Adiabatic QUantum Algorithms" client is available for Windows and Linux.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
credits
Windows 32
Linux
QMulus Help QMulus develop artificial intelligence algorithms. The project, run by Qualia Labs, hosts several research projects which study artificial intelligence. Project participants have the chance to win prizes and may receive other compensation in the future if the project ever becomes for-profit. See more about the project's technology and the project's FAQ.

To participate in the project, download and install the project software. The software does not have a visible user interface unless you configure it to display its screensaver.

ongoing Windows 32
QuantumFIRE alpha Help QuantumFIRE alpha conduct "scientific research in Quantum Foundations and Solid State Physics." Quantum Foundations Theory (the theory of the structure and behavior of atoms and molecules) is not completely understood and the results of this project could overturn theories that have been accepted for decades. This project is a test project to help prepare the official release of the QuantumFIRE project. See more information about the project.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. The project's LOUIS client (currently called casinoAlpha) is available for Windows and Linux.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
unknown credits
Windows 32
Linux
CAS@home Help CAS@home complete various science-related projects. The project's main goal is "to encourage and assist scientists in China to adopt the technologies of volunteer computing and volunteer thinking for their research."

CAS@home's first two projects are a "Short-Cut Threading" protein structure prediction project from Institute of Computing Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and a water purification project from Tsinghua University. As of July 7, 2010, the project is also developing particle physics applications.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
unknown credits
Windows 32
Linux
LHC@home 2.0 Help LHC@home 2.0 conduct physics experiments for scientists at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The project will host several sub-projects for various physics groups at LHC. As of September 8, 2011, the project's Test4theory projecy is gradually opening to new volunteers. Currently participation is by invitation only. Follow instructions on the project website to receive an invitation.

The project is running the following sub-projects:

  • Test4Theory, which began January 31, 2011, is a test project to test and demonstrate a pre-alpha (i.e. early development) version of the LHC@home 2.0 project. The project simulates particle collisions. An invitation code is required to participate in this test project.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. The project's Test4Theory client is available for Windows, Linux and Mac OSX.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
unknown credits
Windows 32
Linux
NEW!
theSkyNet Help theSkyNet support research by radio astronomers all over the world. Radio astronomers create experiments to learn more about the universe and submit data from radio telescopes. This project runs software to analyze the data and prove or disprove the experiments. See more information about the project and the project's FAQ.

As of October 28, 2011, the project is analyzing data from the HIPASS survey. In the future the project will analyze data from ASKAP and other sources. As of 2012 the project is processing data from the Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium (PS1SC) telescope and helping to study other galaxies.

The project uses a self-contained software application, written in Java, called Nereus. To participate in the project, click the "click here run theSkyNet without having to register" link on the project's main page to participate anonymously, or register for a free acount on the project website and click the link on your individual page to track your contributions to the project. The project opens a new web page which runs the Nereus application automatically until you close that web page. You can also download a Windows, MacOSX or Linux installer which installs a service program (a program that runs "behind the scenes" and doesn't have a display window) which runs whenever your computer is running. The web-based software client currently doesn't display any information about what it is processing: future versions of the client will show much more information. Participants receive 1 credit for every 15 minutes the client is available to the project and 1 credit for each 15 MB of data the client processes. 1 client uses 1 computing core. To use more cores, open more clients (you cannot run, or receive credit for, more clients on one system than the total number of cores on the system).

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing Windows 32
Linux
MacOS
NEW!
Computing for Sustainable Water World Community Grid Help Computing for Sustainable Water "study the effects of human activity on a large watershed and gain deeper insights into what actions can lead to restoration, health and sustainability of this important water resource." The project, a collaboration between World Community Grid and University of Virginia, is performing millions of simulations to better understand the "effects that result from a variety of human activity patterns in the Chesapeake Bay area. The researchers hope to be able to apply what is learned from this project across the globe to other regions which face challenges of sustainable water." See more information about the project. See the project's FAQ. The project is ending in October, 2012.

The project uses the BOINC computing platform to run various applications. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. If you already have BOINC installed, you can join this and other World Community Grid BOINC-based project by attaching to the project URL www.worldcommunitygrid.org. You can select/de-select World Community Grid projects in your World Community Grid member page, under My Grid --> My Projects.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing;
unknown results returned
Windows 32
Linux
MacOS
NEW!
Constellation Help Constellation conduct research in various aerospace-related science and engineering projects. See more information about the project.

As of January 25, 2013, the project is running the following sub-projects:

  • TrackJack: ascent trajectory simulation and optimization for space-launch systems and spacecraft. The project began as part of a diploma thesis in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Bremen.
  • On the Moon: simulate processes occurring near the surface of the moon. The project attempts to create a total model of the moon system and to compare it with data from the Google Lunar X-PRIZE (GLXP) mission.
  • Extreme Machine: create highly-optimized devices to perform specific tasks in aerospace enviroments. For example, create the most efficient wheel for the lunar environment.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. See the project's Applications page for a current list of applications.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing Windows 32
Linux
NEW!
EDGeS Help EDGeS@Home (Enabling Desktop Grids for e-Science) conduct research in various science, life science, and other projects. The project supports "the execution of selected and validated scientific applications developed by the EGEE and EDGeS community." See more information about the project.

As of April 26, 2013, the project is running the following production-level sub-projects:

  • AutoDock: Molecular docking simulations (production level)

As of April 26, 2013, the project is running the following beta-test level sub-projects:

  • DASP: Signal processing
  • ISDEP: Fusion research
  • ViSAGE: video analysis
  • EMMIL: e-Market simulation
  • MOPAC: Molecular Orbital PACkage
  • pLINK: genotype/phenotype data analysis
  • SLinCA: Scaling Laws in Cluster Aggregation
  • AutoDock: Molecular Docking Simulations
  • Blender: 3D Video Rendering
  • Patient Readmission Application
  • X-ray: Optimisation of X-ray Diffraction Profiles
  • VisIVO: Visualization Interface to the Virtual Observatory

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. See the project's Applications page for a current list of applications.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing Windows 32
Linux
NEW!
ATLAS@Home Help ATLAS@Home run simulations of the ATLAS particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. "Large scale simulation campaigns are a key ingredient for physicists, who permanently compare their data with both 'known' physics and 'new' phenomena predicted by alternative models of the universe, particles and interactions." See the project's FAQ.

The project uses a BOINC-based client. See the BOINC platform information for the latest version of the BOINC client. See the project's Applications page for a current list of applications.

Join a discussion forum about this project.

ongoing Windows 32
Linux
MacOS

The following icons may appear in the Supported Platforms section of the table:
dialup-friendlythis project is good for users with dialup Internet access
paid projectthis is a for-pay project
Windows 32this project runs on the Windows 32-bit platform
Linuxthis project runs on the Linux platform
MacOSthis project runs on the Mac OS platform
Solaristhis project runs on the Solaris platform

Top...